6th MSF 2024 Vision Document Turkish Maritime Vision 2053

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Humanity lives on rising or falling land masses (lithosphere) in the middle of the water sphere that makes up 72% of the Earth's surface, shaped by various terrestrial dynamics. The land masses forming the natural habitat of humanity constitute only a small part of the Earth's surface. The fundamental commonality of all these land masses is that they each have the nature of an "island." The size of islands varies. Some islands are continental, hosting multiple states and nations....

6th MARINE AND MARITIME SECURITY FORUM
Turkish Maritime Vision 2053

(21-22 November 2024, Istanbul)

Humanity lives on rising or falling land masses (lithosphere) in the middle of the water sphere that makes up 72% of the Earth's surface, shaped by various terrestrial dynamics. The land masses forming the natural habitat of humanity constitute only a small part of the Earth's surface. The fundamental commonality of all these land masses is that they each have the nature of an "island." The size of islands varies. Some islands are continental, hosting multiple states and nations. While some islands serve as the living space for only one state, others are part of an archipelago where several states settle. Some islands form one of the many port cities of a state, while others are small seaside towns of a port city consisting of entire islands. While some islands have only a few-house fishing villages, others are not suitable for human habitation due to their morphological features. In addition to all these islands, there are islets, skerries, rocks, shallows, and reefs that engage in various economic activities or cause problems related to international maritime law. Ultimately, the entire Earth is defined as the Ocean of Continental Islands.

Today, approximately 45% of humanity lives within a 150-kilometer belt from the coasts toward the inland areas, constantly exposed to marine influences. The majority of states' economic activities also take place in this area. As of the beginning of the 21st century, more than 680 million people live at an elevation (height) of less than 10 meters above sea level. In other words, 680 million people, roughly 12% of the world's population, reside in geographies that can be considered low. Scientific studies indicate that this figure will reach about one billion by 2050. This finding suggests that states' dependence on the sea will increase in the next 30 years. On the other hand, another phenomenon addressed by human geography is trade. In the early 21st century, a minimum of 80% of the world's commercial goods are transported by sea, and this ratio increases further in developed countries. Half of the population of developed countries uses marine resources for protein needs. Additionally, 80% of global tourism activities are carried out in coastal areas. Statistics emphasizing the importance of seas, as mentioned above, can be increased significantly. However, fundamentally, the surface of the water is a system of routes where societies continuously transport people, commercial goods, money, information, and cultures. Therefore, there is no land mass on Earth that is not in a relationship or interaction with water geography in terms of security, economic, socio-cultural, legal, and psychosocial contexts. This situation is also valid for human communities whose natural habitat is land masses. Even people living in landlocked countries without any borders with oceans or seas interact with water geography (hydrosphere) through climate, vegetation, and trade. This interaction has been the fundamental motivation pushing civilizations towards the seas for centuries.

Türkiye, within the Ocean of Continental Islands, has a topographical structure consisting of two peninsulas. Its placement in the geography of the Seven Seas has made Türkiye a coastal or neighboring neighbor to many narrow seas. Türkiye, which is adjacent to three seas surrounding the peninsulas, also has an inland sea. This inland sea is located between the Turkish Straits, which are critical sea junctions in global maritime trade. Türkiye has around 180 ports/facilities along its coasts. According to the coastal study information from the Navigation, Hydrography, and Oceanography Department of Türkiye in 2008, Türkiye has 8,483 kilometers of coastline, which constitutes 3% of the world's total coastline. Türkiye's coastlines are approximately 1,719 km on the Black Sea, 1,474 km on the Sea of Marmara, 2,025 km on the Mediterranean, and 3,265 km on the Aegean. Among these coasts, there are 28 coastal or port cities with populations mostly exceeding 750,000, and approximately 60% of Türkiye's population lives in these cities.

Additionally, the majority of the workforce in Türkiye, surrounded by seas on six sides with its two peninsulas, is located in coastal cities. About 60% of Türkiye's Gross Domestic Product is formed through exchange relations in coastal cities. Furthermore, approximately 95% of industrial production, raw and processed material exports and imports in Türkiye are carried out via seas through coastal cities. Most of the arable land in Türkiye is located in regions with access to the sea, either on the coast or in areas close to the coast. It is also noteworthy that the infrastructure facilities of tourism, referred to as the Smokeless Industry and having a high share in Türkiye's Gross Domestic Product, are mostly located in coastal areas and regions close to the sea. All this information indicates that Türkiye should not turn its back on the seas, as it lives in harmony with the sea. Its dependence on the sea is not only in political, military, and economic activities but also in natural disasters and humanitarian aid activities.

In terms of its geopolitical position, Türkiye, which has sea communication lines (SLOCs) and critical sea junctions playing important roles in sustaining global maritime trade, faces fundamental issues of maritime geopolitics in its current foreign policy problems. If we add to this the fact that Türkiye's maritime economy potential is significantly insufficient according to its utilization, it becomes apparent that Türkiye has a long way to go in its maritime awakening and needs a determined and steady progress.

In the long journey of maritime development for Türkiye, academic activities such as this one, aimed at increasing maritime spatial awareness in a way that benefits the public, will contribute to rehabilitating the maritime blindness experienced in the international relations literature. All areas covering Modern Maritime Studies directed toward this goal constitute the main theme of the Maritime and Maritime Security Forum; navies, maritime trade fleets, maritime trading companies, ports and port management, shipyards (including all engineering branches applicable to shipbuilding and ships), fishing activities, seabed mining (including metallurgy, geology, oceanography, hydrography, and seismology), maritime tourism, marinas and marina management, national and international maritime law, maritime education and training institutions and activities, maritime environmentalism, supporting sectors (search and rescue, agency services, pilotage services, navigation-communication facilitation, ship traffic services, maritime meteorology, etc.), maritime history, maritime literature, cultural and sports-themed activities (water sports, museums, etc.). Collaborative approaches and a broad historical vision will be considered in partnership with national/international, military/civil maritime organizations. Elevating academic awareness of "maritime and maritime geopolitics," fulfilling the requirements of this awareness, identifying goals, supplying needs, and building maritime power capabilities at a level that will convert the existing potential into economic prosperity are considered essential to Türkiye's national interests.

The 21st century has gained strong momentum in becoming the Century of Seas and Oceans. Most of the international crises, competitions, wars, alliances, and collaborations focus on the Narrow Seas, Inland Seas, and Marginal Seas around the Eurasian Continental Island. Türkiye's access to Blue Civilization seems possible for it to achieve a prestigious, effective, and strong position internationally in the 21st century. The 6th Marine and Maritime Security Forum, which TASAM National Defense and Security Institute will organize this year, includes a strong motivation point in responding to all the needs mentioned above.

Sub-Themes

Turkish Marine and Maritime Security Vision 2053

New Perspectives and Regional Studies in Maritime Geopolitics;
Mediterranean, Aegean Sea, Black Sea, Oceans, and Poles
Current Threats and Blue Crimes in Maritime Security
Development of Turkish Navalism
Current Trends in the Use of Turkish Naval Diplomacy

Current Concepts and Issues in Building Maritime Capacities
Maritime Power
Sea Power
Navy Power

New Opportunities in Maritime Geo-economics and Türkiye
Administrative and Institutional Structure of Turkish Maritime
Vision and Future of the Turkish Maritime Ecosystem
New Trends in the Blue Economy
Vision and Future of Turkish Maritime Trade
Vision and Future of Turkish Maritime Transportation
Vision and Future of Turkish Maritime Tourism
Capabilities of Türkiye's Shipbuilding and Vision and Future of the Shipbuilding Sector
Turkish Ports; Hinterland, Gateway, and Foreland Development Strategies
Ocean Policies

Environmental Security in Maritime Studies

Digitalization Age in Global Maritime and Emerging Threats

Use of Seas in Disaster Management and Strategies for Sea Bridges

Maritime Geoculture

The Energy Potential of Seas and Sustainable Utilization


 
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Areas

Continents ( 5 Fields )
Action
 Contents ( 472 ) Actiivities ( 219 )
Areas
TASAM Africa 0 149
TASAM Asia 0 236
TASAM Europe 0 44
TASAM Latin America & Carribea... 0 34
TASAM North America 0 9
Regions ( 4 Fields )
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 Contents ( 178 ) Actiivities ( 54 )
Areas
TASAM Balkans 0 93
TASAM Middle East 0 62
TASAM Black Sea and Caucasus 0 16
TASAM Mediterranean 0 7
Identity Fields ( 2 Fields )
Action
 Contents ( 176 ) Actiivities ( 75 )
Areas
TASAM Islamic World 0 147
TASAM Turkic World 0 29
TASAM Türkiye ( 1 Fields )
Action
 Contents ( 229 ) Actiivities ( 60 )
Areas
TASAM Türkiye 0 229

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